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    Jessie - Sexual Assault Advocate
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Thank You For Always Supporting Us

“Let our New Year’s resolution be this: we will be there for one another as fellow members of humanity, in the finest sense of the word.” – Goran Persson

Thanks to your support, look at what Tri-Valley Haven achieved in a year!

  • Over 4,000 calls received through our 24-hour crisis line
  • 344 Clients received safe shelter through our Domestic Violence and Homeless shelters
  • 181 Children received safe shelter through our Domestic Violence and Homeless shelters
  • 4,455 Local Residents in Economic Need assisted at our Food Pantry
  • 227 Survivors of Sexual Assault served through our Rape Crisis Center
  • 3,979 Tri-Valley Students & Community Members received prevention education classes to prevent dating abuse, sexual assault, bullying and more!
  • 4,094 Local Residents in Economic Need signed up for food and gifts through our Holiday Program for Thanksgiving and December Holidays

Clothesline Project at Tri-Valley Haven

But New Year’s Day is more than just a time of looking backward on the previous year.  It’s also about taking the lessons learned from that year and applying them to the year that is coming toward us as fast and surely as the sunrise itself.  It’s about revisiting our core values and saying, “This is who we are. This is who we want to be. And this is what we commit to in the days and weeks and months to come.”

We serve more than the numbers in our emails or blog posts.  Each number is a man, a woman, a child.  Each number is a person who is struggling forward, emerging from pain, dealing with their past, looking toward a brighter future.  Our work here at Tri-Valley Haven is simply this: to be there to support, encourage and provide aid so that each person who comes to us is better able to heal; better able to hope; better able to move forward into their new year in safety and strength.

Thanks to your generosity, Tri-Valley Haven can help women, children and families build a new life, free from violence!" A New Life" was created at the therapeutic art group in our domestic violence shelter!

We could not have fulfilled our work at the Haven last year without your help.  We could not have fulfilled it all these years stretching into our past without the help of people like you.  And we cannot do this work in the year to come without you standing by our side.

Thank you.  Every single one of you.  We hope you had a safe, loving, hopeful and prosperous New Year.

Welcome, 2016!

Geographical Isolation and Serving Diverse Populations – Taking on the Challenge

cropped-map-2Tri-Valley Haven is located in Eastern Alameda County, one of the wealthiest and least diverse areas of the county. Geographically isolated from the rest of the county by the Dublin Grade, our shelter population is vastly more diverse than the area in which we are located. Because of this isolation, shelter residents often tell us they feel especially safe from their abusers in the Tri-Valley.

It is an ongoing struggle for us to attract and retain a diverse shelter staff at a nonprofit salary rate that does not support someone who is living alone or a single parent in our immediate service area. Most of our new staff members live out of the area, either “over the hill” in less expensive parts of Alameda County, in the Brentwood/Antioch area or in Stockton. Staff turnover is more frequent than we would like, most often because these staff members find employment closer to home.

obj40-1Despite these challenges, we are pleased that we have been able to increase the diversity of our staff to try to better reflect the population we serve. When we have a job opening, we advertise widely, and share the job listing with statewide coalitions such as CPEDV and CalCASA in order to reach all of our sister organizations.

We have also greatly benefitted from participation in learning collaboratives such as the Fostering Cultural Competency project, funded by Blue Shield. Through this project, we made connections with other organizations outside of our service area that have expertise in working with specific Asian populations who shared information with us and remain a source of support that we can access when working with a client from a culture we are unfamiliar with. We also had the opportunity to learn about more resources in our own community when each agency in the project convened a panel discussion of representatives from local Asian communities to discuss how domestic violence is viewed and addressed within these communities.1

We look forward to participating in the Next Generation project in which we will share  our experiences with other agencies, and further develop our support system .

Vicki Thompson

Director of Domestic Violence Services

Tri-Valley Haven

Advocate Spotlight: Advocacy & Me

Gunjan is a Sexual Assault Advocate with Tri-Valley HavenGunjan volunteers as Sexual Assault Advocate at Tri-Valley Haven. As a volunteer, she meets with survivors of sexual assault to support them through the reporting process and provide them with resources.


Let me start by saying that working with survivors has been the most gratifying experience of my life. I have had quite a tough life myself and when I sought spiritual guidance, my Guru, my teacher, just told me one thing: Do selfless service – help somebody, anybody. And that’s when I found this amazing place called the “Tri-Valley Haven.”

After going through six months of rigorous training, I was still shaking on my first call at Highland Hospital in Oakland. I didn’t have a clue about my own course of action. I took a deep breath, went inside and every moment after that was just…. me being human. When I am with a survivor, their story becomes mine and their tears come rolling down my own eyes. But in return, my strength becomes their strength to come out of the trauma and take life with full stride, yet again.

Being an advocate has completely transformed me as a person. We all live sheltered lives and make our own small world, the focus of everything. As a sexual assault advocate, I stepped out of my shell and met some wonderful people, whom we refer to as “the survivors”. They are people like us, but life has put them in devastating situations and the least we can do is be there for them. Make them realize their own strength, which has been shadowed by some dark moments for a brief period in their lives.

I believe my job as an advocate is to be there for the Survivor unconditionally, help them revive their emotional strength, make them feel like they are in control and see them smile at the end of it all.


Sexual Assault Advocates must be at least 21 years old and complete a 65-hour training course at Tri-Valley Haven before volunteering. To learn about our advocacy services or other volunteer opportunities, visit our website www.trivalleyhaven.org

Put On Your Running Shoes – Tri-Valley Haven’s Pace For Peace is this Saturday!

Tri-Valley Haven's Pace For Peace is this weekend!Before the sun rises, Tri-Valley Haven’s dedicated staff and volunteers will arrive at our Community Building to set up for our annual Pace For Peace – 5K/10K Run/Walk on Saturday, October 3. We will arrange registration tables, put out coffee, mix Gatorade, set up the water tables and balloon arch and much more while we wait for over 200 runners and walkers to arrive.

Pace For Peace has been an annual event at Tri-Valley Haven for over a decade. Runners, walkers, and supporters gather to raise awareness about domestic violence, sexual assault, homelessness and hunger. It is truly inspiring to see so many people from our local community – and many people from other areas – come out to support Tri-Valley Haven.

Proceeds go directly Tri-Valley Haven’s life-saving services. Last year, we raised over $10,000 and this year we are hoping to raise even more!Saturday is your chance to win a brand new Apple Watch!

New this year we will have Chip Timing, Finisher Medals, Performance T-Shirts, a Spirited 5K Water Table, Great Raffle Prizes and more!  The Haven is also offering a special drawing for participants to win a brand new Apple Watch. Only 200 tickets will be available for a chance to win an Apple Watch –  42mm 7000 Series Space Grey with black sport band. Tickets will be available at packet pick-up on Thursday, so we are encouraging participants who are interested to register early online. If any tickets remain, we will have them on race day in case you missed out!

Join us on Saturday, October 3 for a beautiful 5K/10K run/walk through Livermore’s vineyards. The race starts and finishes at Tri-Valley Haven Community Building, 3663 Pacific Avenue, Livermore. The 10K starts at 8:00 am and the 5K starts at 8:05 am.

Tri-Valley Haven’s Pace For Peace has something for everyone, whether you are a serious runner or just out for a leisurely walk with friends and family supporting a good cause!  You can even bring your dog!

Interested in participating this year? Register online by clicking this link or register at the event on race-day (just remember to get there a early!). You can also fundraise online to support Tri-Valley Haven by clicking this link.

We hope to see you on Saturday!


THANK YOU TO OUR PACE FOR PEACE 5K/10K SPONSORS!

Thank you, Kaiser!Thank you, Goza Gear!Thank you, A-1! Thank you, Betty Taylor! Thank you, Contreras Chiropractic! Thank you, EPIC Insurance!   Thank you, UNCLE Credit Union!  Thank you, Paramedics Plus! Thank you, Stop-N-Wash!Thank you, Page Mill Winery!Thank you, Road ID!  Thank you, Panama Red!Thank you, First Street Alehouse!

Together we build a world without violence!

A Greater Community – The National Sexual Assault Conference from One Advocate’s Perspective

All over the United States, there are people hard at work to end sexual assault and rape. We work full-time or part-time. Sometimes we volunteer. We go to hospitals to be with survivors at midnight after an assault. We are there beside victims as they talk to the police. We are the counselors and group leaders who support trauma survivors as they recall grueling memories. We are the educators who work with teens and the schools to stop rape and harassment on campus. We advocate to local, state, and federal government officials to make our society more just. We visit jails and prisons when someone is victimized while incarcerated. We hear heartbreak. We see tears, courage, and strength.

We listen. We believe. We are there 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

All over the United States, there are people working to end sexual violence. And once a year the people who support sexual assault victims get the chance to come together in one place. We learn and exchange wisdom and ideas; we support each other. We challenge one another to reach further, create change sooner, and spread sexual assault awareness wider.

NSAC GroupThis once-a-year event is at the National Sexual Assault Conference (NSAC).

This year, it was hosted by the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault (CALCASA) in Los Angeles, California. I and a couple coworkers from Tri-Valley Haven’s Rape Crisis Center were fortunate enough to be able to attend the event. The theme was “Inspired by Progress, United by Purpose.”

We were definitely both.

I am sure that anyone who attended the conference would have many stories to tell about what they learned. I am only one person, so I will just talk about what I experienced. And what I experienced was… WOW!

I met the most amazing people at the conference…and amazing barely covers it. Participants included survivors who have become teachers and healers in the NSAC Plenarymovement; people who have been fighting the anti-sexual violence fight for their entire professional lives, and people who have just begun; people who work with survivors individually and people who carry on the anti-rape movement to the White House itself. There were young people, lighting the sky on fire with their passion and their vision, and older people who have contributed to decades of change and know there are still mountains to overcome.

The most wonderful part, for me, of going to the conference was that it embodies the same affirmation that means so much to survivors of violence themselves: You are not alone. For those of us working in the Rape Crisis Movement across the country, our world can seem very small sometimes. We work in cities or suburbs or rural communities. We know everybody in the field near us and rely on them for connection and support. To step into a greater fellowship of human beings all working together to make the world a better, safer, and more just place is just plain moving; humbling.

We had a number of topics this year: building safer college and campus communities, fighting back against rape culture, educating our young men and women to bring change now that will echo for years to come.

Another spotlight was put on ending sexual violence in the military. A recent study shows that sexual violence in the military is far higher than previously reported (new data released by the U.S. Defense Department). Collaborations between rape crisis experts and the military to address sexual violence are so very important. Our soldiers in active service and our veterans both deserve better.

NSAC Forge BoothOther topics included serving survivors of sexual assault in detention, working with male survivors and LGBTQ survivors, preventing child sexual abuse, and much more.

At the conference, I concentrated on the Prison Rape Elimination Act “PREA track”. This training dealt with stopping rape and sexual assault in detention – for example, jail or prison, juvenile detention or an immigration facility.

I have spent the past two years working as a Tri-Valley Haven Sexual Assault Advocate and Crisis Counselor, responding to our local county jail when an inmate calls and requests support after an assault. I am glad to say that the jail staff has been universally welcoming to me, good partners with the Haven, and committed to making their jail safer. Even so, responding to the jail carries with it an emotional weight. I felt that I had already heard some arduous stories. With that being said, the stories I heard from survivors at NSAC stayed with me at night.

Sometimes, society seems to think that anything that happens to a person who is behind the walls of a jail or prison is deserved – they broke the law; they’re getting what is coming to them. Here is a truth: Rape is never part of the sentence. Allowing rape to happen to the people we put in detention, turning a blind eye to it, condoning it in society through jokes…does not make our country safer, quite the opposite. It adds trauma on top of trauma, and ultimately makes us all lesser.

PREA SLIDE 2Roxane Gay summarizes what many people feel about victims of sexual assault in her piece, Bad Victims. “People who have been sexually assaulted know there are good victims and bad victims. Good victims, of course, do not exist but they are an elaborate ideal. They are assaulted in a dark alley by an unknown criminal who has a knife or a gun. They are modestly dressed. They report their assault immediately to law enforcement and submit, willingly, to a rape exam. They answer all questions about their assault lucidly and completely as many times as is necessary. They are adequately prepared for trial. They don’t pester the prosecutor as he or she prepares for trial. When they testify, they are modestly dressed. They are the girl next door. They deserve justice because they are so righteous in their victimhood.”

“Good victims” are never prostitutes. They are never men. They are never gay or transgender. They are never drug addicts. They are never mentally ill. Those are allNSAC PREA slide “bad victims.” The worst victim of them all? Someone who is already in detention.

But when it comes right down to it, we are all human beings with flaws and mistakes and dark sides. None of us is perfect. None of us is a “perfect victim.” And nobody, NOBODY, deserves to be raped or sexually assaulted. Not even someone in prison.

It was good to meet other people who believe that.

It was inspiring to be at the conference with many people who are passionate about this intersection between the world of detention and the world of advocacy. It was also inspiring to see how many of us were at different levels of this journey, from the pioneers, to those who have gotten their toes wet for a few years but are still just beginning, to the people who wish to help and to learn how to do so… and whose journey is about to unfold.

The takeaway for me was that there is no such thing as a perfect survivor of rape. All human beings deserve to live in a world where there is zero tolerance for sexual assault – out on the street, or in a jail or a prison or in an I.C.E. (immigration holding facility). What we do as advocates is to connect with the strength and humanity of every survivor. We remind them of their own assets. We validate that they did not deserve what has been done to them. This is a fact, regardless if we spoke to a victim at our office, in our shelter, at a hospital… or from behind bars.

CALCASA’s National Sexual Assault Conference reminded me that there is a greater community of people working to end sexual assault; my work going into the jail to support survivors reminds me that there is an even greater community than that…the community of humanity itself.

Together, we build a world without violence.

Being Heard: Tri-Valley Haven’s Domestic Violence Support Group

A Source of Strength and Courage - Collage and mixed media.

A Source of Strength and Courage  – Collage and mixed media.

Have you or a loved one experienced domestic violence or dating abuse? Tri-Valley Haven hosts a support group on Friday afternoons in Pleasanton for survivors of domestic violence who have experienced emotional, physical, sexual and/or financial abuse, as well as controlling and unhealthy relationships.

Through the 8-week group, the group participants learn from each other’s experiences and grow in their independence and belief in their own abilities. They identify the various forms of abusive relationships and give examples of how they have experienced these situations. They learn that they are not “crazy” and that “abuse is not my fault.” These women learn about healthy boundaries, communication, coping skills and self-esteem. Mainly, they are given the freedom and space to voice their thoughts and opinions, free from judgment or blame, and to have their experiences validated by others who “get it”.

Many of the survivors express gratitude at having the time and space for people in similar situations to listen to them and to understand – sometimes for the first time in their lives. Feeling heard and understood, as well as empowered, are the powerful tools that these women offer to each other through this group. Tri-Valley Haven is pleased to give these women the space to enhance and heal each others’ lives.

Along with support groups, Tri-Valley Haven also offers individual and family counseling to survivors of domestic violence or sexual assault. If you would like to learn more or schedule an appointment, please call Tri-Valley Haven Community Building at (925) 449-5845.


P4PArtwork2014 WinnerLiz is a counselor at Tri-Valley Haven. She facilitates a weekly Domestic Violence Support Group. For more information about our support groups or individual counseling services, please call 925.449.5845 or visit www.trivalleyhaven.org

At The Haven: Support Groups 101

Support Group PhotoIf you are a survivor, you may have considered joining a support group to connect with other survivors and share your experiences. Tri-Valley Haven (TVH) offers support groups for survivors of domestic violence or sexual assault.

If you’ve never attended a support group before, here is some general information about what we offer!

What is a support group?
Support groups provide a safe space for survivors of domestic violence or sexual assault to share their experiences and connect with each other. Tri-Valley Haven’s support groups usually run 8 weeks and they are closed groups, meaning participants must sign up for the group in advance.

New participants are only accepted at the start of each support group. We do not accept for drop-ins.

What are the benefits of a support group?
Many survivors feel they are alone, so support groups give survivors an opportunity to connect with others who have also experienced domestic violence or sexual assault. Often survivors are relieved to have a safe, confidential space where they can talk about the abuse or assault.

Our support groups also aim to support survivors as they begin the healing process and give them tools to help them along the way. We also focus on helping participants to develop healthy coping skills and practice self-care.

Who facilitates a support group?
Our support groups are facilitated by therapists or crisis counselors who have received special training to work with survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault through Tri-Valley Haven.

How do I sign up for a support group at Tri-Valley Haven?
All participants must call Tri-Valley Haven and sign up in advance. After participants sign up, the facilitator will give participants more details about the group, including the location of group meetings.

Domestic Violence Support Group in Pleasanton
Start date: Friday, July 17, 2015 (1 – 2:30 pm)
Sign up: Call Liz at 925.449.5845 ext. 2718
Participants must call ahead. No drop-ins.

Sexual Assault Support Group in Livermore
Start date: Wednesday, July 22, 2015 (5:30 – 7 pm)
Sign up: Call Jessie at 925.449.5845 ext. 2727
Participants must call ahead. No drop-ins.

I am a loved one of a survivor. Can I attend a support group at Tri-Valley Haven?
Currently we only offer support groups for survivors of domestic violence or sexual assault. However both survivors and loved ones may receive individual counseling at Tri-Valley Haven.

Do you offer support groups for LGBTQ survivors?
Our support groups are open to LGBTQ survivors, though currently we do not offer separate support groups for only LGBTQ survivors. If there is enough interest, we may offer one in the future!

Do you offer support groups for men?
Currently we do not offer an all-men support group. We hope to offer specific groups for male survivors in the future. If you are a male survivor and would be interested in an all-men support group, please let our counseling department know!

How can I join a support group or find out more?
If you would like more information or are interested in one of our support groups, please visit our website www.trivalleyhaven.org or call:

Tri-Valley Haven Community Building: 925.449.5845
Domestic Violence Support Group: Liz @ 925.449.5845 ext. 2718
Sexual Assault Support Group: Jessie @ 925.449.5845 ext 2727


logoIf you or a loved one is survivor of domestic violence or sexual assault, Tri-Valley Haven can help. We offer individual counseling, support groups, advocacy, shelter services and a 24-hour crisis line at 800.884.8119. We are a nonprofit organization that relies on the availability of grants and the generosity of our donors to fund our life-saving programs.

To learn more about our live-saving services and how you can help us keep our doors open, visit www.trivalleyhaven.org!

Sexual Assault Awareness Month – Tri-Valley Haven’s Events Calendar

In 2001, April was officially designated as National Sexual Assault Awareness Month (#SAAM) in the U.S. This month, Tri-Valley Haven is hosting a number of events to raise awareness and support survivors – and you can also get involved!


Pace for Peace – Hope Run
Saturday, April 18 at 8 am (registration starts at 7 am)

Want to support local survivors in our community and Tri-Valley Haven services? Please join us on Saturday, April 18, for a fun Pace for Peace – Hope Run (5K/10K walk/run) through Livermore’s beautiful wine country! This event directly benefits Tri-Valley Haven’s services for survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, homelessness and hunger. Start/Finish is at Tri-Valley Haven, 3663 Pacific Avenue in Livermore.

You can register to run now at our Active.com site! Or you can directly download a printable version of our sign-up sheet here at this link.

Remember to share why you will #PaceForPeace on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram!

Las Positas/ Tri-Valley Haven SAAM Event
Thursday, April 23 at 11 am

The Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) 2015 campaign focuses on campus sexual violence prevention. Help Tri-Valley Haven and Las Positas College create communities that prevent violence and build campuses that respond well. Everyone can play a role in creating safer campuses and take action to prevent sexual violence.

Tri-Valley Haven’s Las Positas Event will take place at the Quad at Las Positas College, 3000 Campus Hill Drive, Livermore starting at 11 am on April 23rd. It will feature resources for survivors of sexual violence, information about campus sexual assault, prevention, healthy sexuality, and consent.

Candlelight March
Commemorating Sexual Assault Awareness Month
Friday, April 24 at 7pm

Stand against sexual assault and show your solidarity with survivors in our local community! Join us for a Candlelight March Commemorating Sexual Assault Awareness Month on Friday, April 24th at 7 pm in Downtown Livermore. The march will take place along First Street, in Livermore. Meet at Lizzy Fountain Park, on the corner of First St and Livermore Avenue in Downtown Livermore.

Parking is available in the lot behind the stores. For more information, please call (925) 449-5845.

Denim Day
Wednesday, April 29

Denim Day was originally a protest against a ruling by the Italian Supreme Court where a rape conviction was overturned because the judges felt that the victim could not have been raped since she was wearing tight jeans. The following day, women in the Italian Parliament came to work wearing jeans in solidarity with the victim. Unfortunately, similar stories occur every day in the Unites States. Denim Day has became an international campaign against victim-blaming.

Every year, Tri-Valley Haven staff and volunteers participate in Denim Day. We will be wearing blue jeans, as well as Denim Day buttons and stickers, encouraging people to ask us about Denim Day. Get involved by sharing why you’re wearing jeans on April 29. Post pictures of your jeans to social media and remember to tag @Tri-ValleyHaven and #DenimDay!

The Clothesline Project at Tri-Valley Haven
Monday-Thursday, 9 am – 5 pm

The Clothesline Project was started by a group of women in Cape Cod, Massachusetts in 1990 to spread awareness about violence against women. Survivors were invited to decorate a t-shirt, expressing their story through words and art. These t-shirts were hung on a clothesline display to honor survivors and spread awareness. Now rape crisis centers, domestic violence centers and college campuses in U.S display their own individual Clothesline Projects every year.

Come see Tri-Valley Haven’s Clotheslines Project display at our Community Building, 3663 Pacific Avenue, Livermore. T-shirts from local survivors and their loved ones will be displayed throughout the month during our business hours.

 

Why Will You Rise? Valentine’s Day! One Billion Rising 2015… flashmobs, catchy songs… and a very serious message

1br_rev_landscape_stack_w.date_whiteOne Billion Rising is the biggest mass action to end violence against women in human history.  The campaign, launched on Valentine’s Day 2012, began as a call to action based on the staggering statistic that 1 in 3 women on the planet will be beaten or raped during her lifetime. With the world population at 7 billion, this adds up to more than ONE BILLION WOMEN AND GIRLS.

 

 

On 14 February 2013, people across the world came together to express their outrage, strike, dance, and RISE in defiance of the injustices women suffer, demanding an end at last to violence against women.

823490_588096431218669_772961687_oIn 2013, Tri-Valley Haven was among the multitudes of individuals and organizations rising up to demand that these857261_588096311218681_434111015_o issues be looked at unflinchingly and changes made globally. 

Last year, on 14 February 2014, One Billion Rising for Justice focused on the issue of justice for all survivors of gender violence, and highlighted the impunity that lives at the intersection of poverty, racism, war, the plunder of the environment, capitalism, imperialism, and patriarchy. Events took place in 200 countries, where women, men, and youth came together to Rise, Release, and Dance outside of court houses, police stations, government offices, school administration buildings, work places, sites of environmental injustice, military courts, embassies, places of worship, homes, or simply public gathering places where women deserve to feel safe but too often do not. The campaign was covered widely by media in all corners of world including The New York Times, The Guardian, NPR, and many more.

One Billion Rising 2014 - Group 002Again, Tri-Valley Haven was a participant, sharing the reasons all of us as staff and volunteers stood by this cause and helping to spread the message.

This year in 2015, One Billion Rising is rising for Revolution and again, Tri-Valley Haven rises too. We invite you to join us as we gather for a flash mob in downtown Livermore!  For more information on the flash mob, come check out our Event Page on Facebook, and if you want to join us we even have links to HOW TO DO THE DANCE and we have PUBLIC DANCE PRACTICES THIS WEEK AT OUR COMMUNITY BUILDING!  (Tuesday at 3 PM and Thursday at 4 PM at our Community Building at 3663 Pacific Avenue in Livermore.)

We had a great time in 2013 and we can’t wait to Strike, Dance, Rise again.  Be there.  Be the change you want to see in the world.

(And dance, dance, dance…!)

Teen Dating Violence Awareness at Dublin High School

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, so Tri-Valley Haven headed out to Dublin High School to spread awareness last week. Together the Haven joined Mrs. Slavec and the Be Strong Girls Group to educate teens about dating violence. Students pledged to engage in healthy relationships and received information about dating abuse and the Be Strong Girls Group.

Be Strong is an empowerment group for girls in high school. Tri-Valley Haven facilitates monthly group meetings and provide a open, safe space for the girls to discuss different topics related to gender, self-esteem and leadership. For our Teen Dating Violence Awareness event, each girl was responsible for organizing a part of the event. They also played a vital role in spreading the word about the event ahead of time and encouraging their classmates to participate.

When we hear discussions about dating violence, they often focus on adults who have been in abusive relationship. However 1 in 3 teens in the U.S. has experienced physical, sexual, emotional or verbal abuse by a dating partner.

Dublin HS BeStrong Teen Dating Awareness Month Event 111This is why Tri-Valley Haven is dedicated to educating teens about healthy relationships and the warning signs of abuse. We provide a safe space for teens to discuss what they see happening at their school and how they can keep themselves safe – emotionally and physically.

Thanks to Mrs. Slavec and our Be Strong Girls Group, our Tri-Valley Haven Teen Dating Violence Awareness Event was a success! It was inspiring to witness the Be Strong girls educating their classmates about this issue. After the event, we displayed the pledges on the doors and windows of the school library as part of Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month.

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